Why does education stink in NYC?

Nancy Borowick

Ever wonder why our education stinks in NYC?  The World Economic Council rates the USA so low.

Could be the old boys network or the NAACP? The NAACP needs unions dues.  And money is important.  Probably more important than education right Benjamin Jealous? Why would he care about poor black children of New York City.  Does it matter that he graduated from Columbia University?

In fact, the NAACP filed a lawsuit with the United Federation of Teachers to stop the expansion of 19 charter schools across the City of New York.

Ben–what a wonderful education you received at Columbia University.  How sad for the urban population of New York City.

I know how badly the poor black children want to believe that you would never betray them.  That you would do everything in your power to take care of them.

But do me a favor and prove me wrong–PLEASE, prove to me that the    NAACP dues are not more important than educating the young people of New York City. 

Prove to me that leadership, courage and doing the right thing is costs you money–and that just like anyone else, you understand the temptations of serving a any constituency?

You aren’t alone Ben.

In fact, recently the World Economic Council (last year and they are meeting again right now) found the following:

Four core interventions to improve the quality of teaching and learning:
1. Utilization of communication technologies and social networking mechanisms to disseminate effective curricula and instructional practices, and to create global professional communities of practice.
2. Identification and dissemination of global best practices to attract high-quality applicants to the teaching profession.
3. Identification and dissemination of global best practices in teacher professional development.
4. Identification and dissemination of global best practices in school leadership development.

Design a process to identify and disseminate exemplary instructional programs to develop 21st century skills at the K-12 level.
2. Leverage international best practice to support national efforts to attract high-quality candidates into the teaching profession.
3. Define how best to implement and scale up highly effective teacher professional development programmes.
4. Develop further high-impact leadership in education.

Let’s give the young poor students of NYC what you think they should have–and what is that Ben? A crappy education?

Design a process to identify and disseminate exemplary instructional programs to develop 21st century skills at the K-12 level.
2. Leverage international best practice to support national efforts to attract high-quality candidates into the teaching profession.
3. Define how best to implement and scale up highly effective teacher professional development programmes.
4. Develop further high-impact leadership in education.
Discussions in Dubai, especially those involving cross-Council consultations, highlighted the following key points:
• The looming social and political crisis that could result from the combination of a protracted economic recession, high youth unemployment, social inequality and exclusion all related to the under-performance of education systems, particularly with regards to the most vulnerable groups, highlight that education is a cornerstone of global risk.
• The single most important educational outcome that could mitigate this crisis is the improvement of the quality and relevance of education through the provision of effective opportunities for all students to develop the skills and dispositions that will allow them to become effective and engaged citizens, and capable and productive actors in the workforce.

But according to a McKinsey study on education, “How the world’s most improved school systems keep getting better,” cites that countries doubled and even tripled their spending on education in real terms between 1970 and 19945.  Yet  despite that increase, student student outcomes were unrelated, the either stagnated or
regressed.

Moreover, what McKinsey found was spending levels of performance
– until the USD 6,000 spend per student (PPP)
mark is reached, system performance spans the full spectrum of poor, fair, good, and great.

Because thanks to the Teachers  Union, status quo is fab!  You wonder why our education stinks?

Should anyone be accountable? No one is responsible right?  It’s more money.

Maybe you ought think about education a little differently Ben.  It’s sort of like a graduation speech when you’re asked to give one.  Maybe altruism and benevolence isn’t in your DNA.

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